there's no map and a compass wouldn't help at all.

Oct 5

(via dudetube)


thebettedavis:

Leslie and I did Petrified Forest, he was very chummy. I loved the part of Gabrielle, the painter, but because of the Production Code, I couldn’t read the line I liked best. Here is this girl, like a fish out of water, stuck in that gas station in the middle of the Mojave desert, and no one but Howard, the vagabond, understands her. And she says, ‘My name is Gabrielle, but goddamn wouldn’t  you know these bastards call me “Gabby?” 

-Bette Davis

(via jonahryans)


savvyifyanasty:

> perfff

savvyifyanasty:

> perfff

(via savvyifyanasty)



(via dudetube)


crownyourcaptain:

htmlwings:

wilderskin:

Supermodel Karlie Kloss was photoshopped to look less thin for a Numero campaign. There are so many things wrong with this.  Models are forced to be incredibly thin to fit a certain aesthetic, but when they do, they’re so emaciated that they have to be photoshopped to not look sick.

Robin Hardy, a former creative director at Vogue, has commented on the practice of photoshopping to cover up the aesthetic and health costs of extreme thinness:
“At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing…
But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great!
They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks.
Thanks to retouching, our readers… never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes.”

omg

crownyourcaptain:

htmlwings:

wilderskin:

Supermodel Karlie Kloss was photoshopped to look less thin for a Numero campaign. There are so many things wrong with this.  Models are forced to be incredibly thin to fit a certain aesthetic, but when they do, they’re so emaciated that they have to be photoshopped to not look sick.

Robin Hardy, a former creative director at Vogue, has commented on the practice of photoshopping to cover up the aesthetic and health costs of extreme thinness:

At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing…

But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great!

They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks.

Thanks to retouching, our readers… never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes.”

omg

(via raspboc)



Feb 9

georgeeene:

potluckswithmary:

Hyperrealism with pencil and ink” by Karla Mialynne

.

these are amazing.

(via onlysillyhats)



Feb 8

wearewildflowers:

Flawless human being

(via thechriscrocker)



(via diagnonsense)



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